Under Milk Wood ( cont 3)

Willy Nilly

Morning, Mrs Ogmore–Pritchard.

 

Mrs Ogmore — Pritchard

Good morning, postman.

 

Willy Nilly

Here’s a letter for you with stamped and addressed envelope enclosed, all the way from Builth Wells. A gentleman wants to study birds and can he have accommodation for two weeks and a bath vegetarian.

 

Mrs Ogmore — Pritchard

No.

 

Willy Nilly [Persuasively]

 

You wouldn’t know he was in the house, Mrs Ogmore–Pritchard. He’d be out in the mornings at the bang of dawn with his bag of breadcrumbs and his little telescope . . .

 

Mrs Ogmore — Pritchard

And come home at all hours covered with feathers. I don’t want persons in my nice clean rooms breathing all over the chairs . . .

 

Willy Nilly

Cross my heart, he won’t breathe.

 

Mrs Ogmore-Pritchard

. . . and putting their feet on my carpets and sneezing on my china and sleeping in my sheets . . .

 

Willy Nilly

He only wants a single bed, Mrs Ogmore. Pritchard.

 

[Door slams

 

Captain Cat [Softly]

 

And back she goes to the kitchen to polish the potatoes.

 

First voice

Captain Cat hears Willy Nilly’s feet heavy on the distant cobbles.

 

Captain Cat

One, two, three, four, five . . . That’s Mrs Rose Cottage. What’s today? To-day she gets the letter from her sister in Gorslas. How’s the twins’ teeth?

 

He’s stopping at School House.

 

Willy Nilly

Morning, Mrs Pugh. Mrs Ogmore–Pritchard won’t have a gentleman in from Builth Wells because he’ll sleep in her sheets, Mrs Rose Cottage’s sister in Gorslas’s twins have got to have them out . . .

 

Mrs Pugh

Give me the parcel.

 

Willy Nilly

It’s for Mr Pugh, Mrs Pugh.

 

Mrs Pugh

Never you mind. What’s inside it?

 

Willy Nilly

A book called Lives of the Great Poisoners.

 

Captain Cat

That’s Manchester House.

 

Willy Nilly

Morning, Mr Edwards. Very small news. Mrs Ogmore–Pritchard won’t have birds in the house, and Mr Pugh’s bought a book now on how to do in Mrs Pugh.

 

Mr Edwards

Have you got a letter from her?

 

Willy Nilly

Miss Price loves you with all her heart. Smelling of lavender today. She’s down to the last of the elderflower wine but the quince jam’s bearing up and she’s knitting roses on the doilies. Last week she sold three jars of boiled sweets, pound of humbugs, half a box of jellybabies and six coloured photos of Llaregyb. Yours for ever. Then twenty-one X’s.

 

Mr Edwards

Oh, Willy Nilly, she’s a ruby! Here’s my letter. Put it into her hands now.

 

[Slow feet on cobbles, quicker feet approaching

 

Captain Cat

Mr Waldo hurrying to the Sailors Arms. Pint of stout with a egg in it. [Footsteps stop

 

[Softly] There’s a letter for him.

 

Willy Nilly

It’s another paternity summons, Mr Waldo.

 

First voice

The quick footsteps hurry on along the cobbles and up three steps to the Sailors Arms.

 

Mr Waldo [Calling out]

 

Quick, Sinbad. Pint of stout. And no egg in.

 

First voice

People are moving now up and down the cobbled street.

 

Captain Cat

All the women are out this morning, in the sun. You can tell it’s Spring. There goes Mrs Cherry, you can tell her by her trotters, off she trots new as a daisy. Who’s that talking by the pump? Mrs Floyd and Boyo, talking flatfish. What can you talk about flatfish? That’s Mrs Dai Bread One, waltzing up the street like a jelly, every time she shakes it’s slap slap slap. Who’s that? Mrs Butcher Beynon with her pet black cat, it follows her everywhere, miaow and all. There goes Mrs Twenty–Three, important, the sun gets up and goes down in her dewlap, when she shuts her eyes, it’s night. High heels now, in the morning too, Mrs Rose Cottage’s eldest Mae, seventeen and never been kissed ho ho, going young and milking under my window to the field with the nannygoats, she reminds me all the way. Can’t hear what the women are gabbing round the pump. Same as ever. Who’s having a baby, who blacked whose eye, seen Polly Garter giving her belly an airing, there should be a law, seen Mrs Beynon’s new mauve jumper, it’s her old grey jumper dyed, who’s dead, who’s dying, there’s a lovely day, oh the cost of soapflakes!

 

[Organ music, distant

 

Captain Cat

Organ Morgan’s at it early. You can tell it’s Spring.

 

First voice

And he hears the noise of milk-cans.

 

Captain Cat

Ocky Milkman on his round. I will say this, his milk’s as fresh as the dew. Half dew it is. Snuffle on, Ocky, watering the town . . . Somebody’s coming. Now the voices round the pump can see somebody coming. Hush, there’s a hush! You can tell by the noise of the hush, it’s Polly Garter. [Louder] Hullo, Polly, who’s there?

 

Polly Garter [Off]

 

Me, love.

 

Captain Cat

That’s Polly Garter. [Softly] Hullo, Polly my love, can you hear the dumb goose-hiss of the wives as they huddle and peck or flounce at a waddle away? Who cuddled you when? Which of their pandering hubbies moaned in Milk Wood for your naughty mothering arms and body like a wardrobe, love? Scrub the floors of the Welfare Hall for the Mothers’ Union Social Dance, you’re one mother won’t wriggle her roly poly bum or pat her fat little buttery feet in that wedding-ringed holy to-night though the waltzing breadwinners snatched from the cosy smoke of the Sailors Arms will grizzle and mope.

 

[A cock crows

 

Captain Cat

Too late, cock, too late

 

Second voice

for the town’s half over with its morning. The morning’s busy as bees.

 

[Organ music fades into silence

 

First voice

There’s the clip clop of horses on the sunhoneyed cobbles of the humming streets, hammering of horse — shoes, gobble quack and cackle, tomtit twitter from the bird-ounced boughs, braying on Donkey Down. Bread is baking, pigs are grunting, chop goes the butcher, milk-churns bell, tills ring, sheep cough, dogs shout, saws sing. Oh, the Spring whinny and morning moo from the clog dancing farms, the gulls’ gab and rabble on the boat-bobbing river and sea and the cockles bubbling in the sand, scamper of sanderlings, curlew cry, crow caw, pigeon coo, clock strike, bull bellow, and the ragged gabble of the beargarden school as the women scratch and babble in Mrs Organ Morgan’s general shop where everything is sold: custard, buckets, henna, rat-traps, shrimp-nets, sugar, stamps, confetti, paraffin, hatchets, whistles.

 

First woman

Mrs Ogmore–Pritchard

 

Second woman

la di da

 

First woman

got a man in Builth Wells

 

Third woman

and he got a little telescope to look at birds

 

Second woman

Willy Nilly said

 

Third woman

Remember her first husband? He didn’t need a telescope

 

First woman

he looked at them undressing through the keyhole

 

Third woman

and he used to shout Tallyho

 

Second woman

but Mr Ogmore was a proper gentleman

 

First woman

even though he hanged his collie.

 

Third woman

Seen Mrs Butcher Beynon?

 

Second woman

she said Butcher Beynon put dogs in the mincer

 

First woman

go on, he’s pulling her leg

 

Third woman

now don’t you dare tell her that, there’s a dear

 

Second woman

or she’ll think he’s trying to pull it off and eat it,

 

Fourth woman

There’s a nasty lot live here when you come to think.

 

First woman

Look at that Nogood Boyo now

 

Second woman

too lazy to wipe his snout

 

Third woman

and going out fishing every day and all he ever brought back was a Mrs Samuels

 

First woman

been in the water a week.

 

Second woman

And look at Ocky Milkman’s wife that nobody’s ever seen

 

First woman

he keeps her in the cupboard with the empties

 

Third woman

and think of Dai Bread with two wives

 

Secone woman

one for the daytime one for the night.

 

Fourth woman

Men are brutes on the quiet.

 

Third woman

And how’s Organ Morgan, Mrs Morgan?

 

First woman

you look dead beat

 

Second woman

it’s organ organ all the time with him

 

Third woman

up every night until midnight playing the organ.

 

Mrs Organ Morgan

Oh, I’m a martyr to music.

 

First voice

Outside, the sun springs down on the rough and tumbling town. It runs through the hedges of Goosegog Lane, cuffing the birds to sing. Spring whips green down Cockle Row, and the shells ring out. Llaregyb this snip of a morning is wildfruit and warm, the streets, fields, sands and waters springing in the young sun.

 

Second voice

Evans the Death presses hard with black gloves on the coffin of his breast in case his hearts jumps out,

 

Evans the Death [Harshly]

 

Where’s your dignity. Lie down.

 

Second voice

Spring stirs Gossamer Beynon schoolmistress like spoon.

 

Gossamer Beynon [Tearfully]

 

Oh, what can I do? I’ll never be refined if I twitch.

 

Second voice

Spring this strong morning foams in a flame in Jack Black as he cobbles a high-heeled shoe for Mrs Dai Bread Two the gypsy, but he hammers it sternly out.

 

Jack Black [To a hammer rhythm]

 

There is no leg belonging to the foot that belongs to this shoe.

 

Second voice

The sun and the green breeze ship Captain Cat sea-memory again.

 

Captain Cat

No, I’ll take the mulatto, by God, who’s captain here? Parlez-vous jig jig, Madam?

 

Second voice

Mary Ann Sailors says very softly to herself as she looks out at Llaregyb Hill from the bedroom where she was born

 

Mary Ann Sailors [Loudly]

 

 

It is Spring in Llaregyb in the sun in my old age, and this is the Chosen Land.

Estás leyendo en Ablik

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